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Excellence Defined Biblically: Are We Half-Hearted Creatures? (Part Four)
Excellence Defined Biblically: Are We Half-Hearted Creatures? (Part Four)

Do not be a half-hearted creature, but chase the holiday at the sea in your homes and classrooms! Never be easily pleased! There is great hope for the journey – Christ in you!

Over the last several weeks, I purposed to paint a picture for thinking deeply about how excellence is defined biblically. The first week I shared Drew Holcomb's comments at our fiftieth anniversary celebration about being a musician who is a Christian rather than a Christian musician. I shared C.S. Lewis's comments in his work, The Weight of Glory, stating, "we are half-hearted creatures" that "are far too easily pleased." The second week I summarized my study of the Old and New Testaments on excellence by sharing two primary themes – 1) Excellence can be recognized and substantiated in culture (1 Kings 10, 2 Chronicles 9, and Daniel 5), and 2) Scripture indicates there is an inextricable connection among love, knowledge, and excellence (1 Corinthians 12, 13, and Philippians 1:9-11). Last week, I shared what this means for us in praxis. In this final article, I will build off what has already been stated and look to excellence in the future.

If we are to think deeply about excellence and use Scripture as our guide and standard for excellence, then we must meditate on the fact that Jesus was full of grace and truth (John 1:14 and 17). We must break out of the box of allowing other schools – independent, charter, or public – to be the standard for excellence. It means we become redemptive thought leaders on a conversational journey that bears fruit in the cultural gardens we tend. As redemptive regents of our children and students, imagine a child who begins to cultivate curiosity leading to inspirational discovery. Excellence defined biblically means we do not accept the status quo. We reject mediocrity and pursue what could be . . . It begins with rejection of the subpar and ends with redemption of the supra.

When we are called to do something unto the Lordship of Jesus Christ, namely Christian education, we are called to excellence. This is a nonnegotiable in Scripture (1 Corinthians 10:31; 2 Corinthians 8:7; Philippians 4:8; Colossians 3:17, 23; and 2 Peter 1:3). I am thankful to say the pursuit of excellence is different from being perfect. Parent, student, teacher, and leader pursue excellence rooted in the gospel. I invite you to enter a conversation in your sphere of influence about the pursuit of excellence. Do not be a half-hearted creature, but chase the holiday at the sea in your homes and classrooms! Never be easily pleased! There is great hope for the journey – Christ in you!

References

Holcomb, Drew. Celebrate and Shine: An Evening to Reflect Upon 50 Years of God's Grace at Evangelical Christian School and Share Our Joy for the Future! Memphis, TN. September 17, 2015.

Lewis, C.S. 2001. The Weight of Glory. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers. Page 26.

Scripture quotes are from the English Standard Version (ESV).

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